0

You have no items in your shopping cart.

$175.00
0 0 0
An individualized, studio art class designed to introduced you to a solid foundation in watercolor painting. Learn the basics, starting with beginner's techniques and essential skills.  We will concentrate on painting beautiful color and creative designs by exploring the expressive potential of the medium. Light and color, transparency, composition and...

An individualized, studio art class designed to introduced you to a solid foundation in watercolor painting. Learn the basics, starting with beginner's techniques and essential skills.  We will concentrate on painting beautiful color and creative designs by exploring the expressive potential of the medium. Light and color, transparency, composition and color theory as well as paper choice and brush techniques such as washes, wet-in-wet, dry brush, and color mixing will be covered. This class is best for those wanting a structured and sequential class focusing on technique, for beginners or intermediate students with some drawing experience. 

  • Fridays, Summer Session 1, 8/10-8/31, 9:00am-11:00am
  • Cost: $125 Per Session (Materials Not Included)
  • Instructor: Taylor Martin
  • Inquire about private sessions

Materials: 

download printable list here

WATERCOLOR SUPPLIES

INSTRUCTOR: TAYLOR MARTIN

 

The prices on most of the supplies will vary depending on whether you buy professional grade items or beginner. The majority of everything you purchase can be found at Michaels or bought online on Amazon, Utrecht, JerrysArtarama, or DickBlick. Here’s a list of the materials you should have, followed by a more in depth explanation of each item:

 

  • Watercolor pan/palette/tray
  • Paints
  • Brushes
  • Paper
  • Porcelain dish
  • Two cups (for water. can be plastic, ceramic, metal, etc.)
  • Optional extras**

 

Watercolor Pan/Palette/Tray:

Watercolor trays are great because they can store and conserve all of your paints. You can buy a tin one that already comes with all of the paints in it which may end up being more cost effective, or you can buy a basic plastic one and then buy your tubes of paint separately. If you do buy a plastic one I recommend getting one that is either able to close or has a lid.

 

Paints:

Winsor and Newton is a great brand for watercolor paint. If you already have watercolor paints that you’d like to use instead that’s fine too. If you don't want to buy the pan that already has the paints in it then you’ll want to get tubes. If you do get the pan and for some reason need to buy more paint, Winsor and Newton makes the paint in little square forms to fit in the pan. Regardless of what form of paint you get, you should have these colors:

  • Yellow Ochre*
  • Burnt Sienna*
  • Raw Umber
  • Venetian Red*
  • Permanent Rose*
  • Scarlet Lake
  • Winsor Blue (red shade)*
  • Winsor Blue (green shade)*
  • Lemon Yellow Deep
  • Winsor Yellow*
  • Viridian Green*
  • Colbalt Green (yellow shade)

 

Anything with a * symbol next to it are what you should have, anything else on the list is recommended but optional.

Also if you get the watercolor pan and it doesn’t come with these specific colors it’s okay, they’ll usually be similar to the ones i’ve listed.

           

Brushes:

If you’re looking for quality and don’t mind spending the money for it then you want to get any Kolinsky Sable brush, I personally use Raphael’s brand. Otherwise any watercolor brush that doesn’t shed will get the job done. At least three brushes ranging in size is recommended.

 

Paper:

Arches Watercolor Block, hot or cold pressed.

  • Hot pressed is going to be smoother on the surface, paint will dry slower, and will be easier to erase/fix mistakes. This paper is better if you want to focus on being detailed with your paintings or have the washes be smoother. If you like the idea of adding pen/ink it’ll flow well on this surface because it’s not as rough as other papers.
  • Cold pressed is slightly rougher texture, paint dries a little faster, and it’s not as easy to erase. You may find you have more control with the water on the page because it dries quicker and it can create a more abstracted water effect. It’s great for landscapes and ideal for beginners.

 

Whichever you choose it fine, or if you want to get one of each that’s great too. For sizes I recommend anything between 6 x 12 and 12 x 16. The larger the block, the more expensive it will be so it’s your personal choice which size you’d like to go for.

 

**also the BLOCKS are better than PADS because the blocks are adhered to the page below it, therefore the page won’t warp if there’s excess water on it.

 

Porcelain dish or palette

Although it sounds like it’s the same as the watercolor pan it’s actually different and very inexpensive. The one I have is small and was only $5. This is just a small dish with little pools where the paint that you’ve mixed up can go. I’ve included the link of the exact one I purchased, but if you find one somewhere else or already have one that’s fine too.

 

http://www.jerrysartarama.com/english-glazed-porcelain-palettes?gclid=CjwKCAiAqvXTBRBuEiwAE54dcLgOlBFBPrAMUgQQJfWwZTJT-mCF4BVKkKnBN_exJo8x7Y8T3nf3NxoC3rMQAvD_BwE

 

Extras:

  • Winsor and Newton masking fluid

            -great for areas you don’t want affected by paint

 

  • Some kind of highlight for finishing touches:

            -I use gouache, but a white gel pen or a white colored pencil would do fine. You could also use watered down acrylic paint with a small brush too.

Just added to your wishlist:
My Wishlist
Just added to your cart:
My Cart